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HOW DO YOU PREVENT OSTEOPOROSIS?

Strategies for the Prevention of Osteoporosis
Dr Betty Kamen Ph.D

The brittle part of the bone is magnesium, and it is the calcium wrapping that gives strength to the skeleton. The connective tissue is primarily zinc. The bones and the connective tissue depend on adequate amounts of vitamin D and the trace mineral Boron for maximum health.

"There is no doubt that everyone's diet should be adequate in all nutrients, including calcium. Sufficient calcium through food consumption implies an overall adequate diet, especially relating to the intake of Vitamin D, phosphorous, protein, B-complex vitamins and energy."

"An active lifestyle with a daily weight-bearing activity is of equal importance."

Part of the solution is to reduce risk factors associated with bone demineralization. Among the negative lifestyle variables on skelatal staus are:

  • smoking
  • oral contraceptives
  • sugar
  • salt
  • high-fat and high-protein diets
  • soft drinks
  • alcohol

SUMMARY:

"Medical literature is filled with many more articles supporting the view that calcium supplementation in huge doses, particularly without the necessary cofactors, is not the way to control or prevent osteoporosis."

"Aditional research demonstrates that such supplementation may hinder or halt critical bone remodeling, [53] cause calcification of soft muscle tissue, [54] reduce the absorption of other minerals. [55] trigger stomach acid surge, [56] induce neuro-logical symptons, generate kidney stones, impair kidney function, [57] reduce bone strength and even cause internal bleeding.[58]"

"Based on research and clinical experience, plus the studies of world renowned experts, taking more than a low-dose calcium supplement is unnecessary and taking calcium alone is worthless. "

Multivitamin/mineral supplements with an additional vitamin C, plus a small-dose of calcium/magnesium makes the most sense. Vitamin D3, ChromeMate, silicon and boron are beneficial additions.

"Responsible calcium supplementation requires calcium in smaller doses, so that YOU are in control of the amounts you consume."

OTHER FOOD-TYPE SUPPLEMENTS:

  • Acidophilus
  • Chlorella
  • Honey Bee Pollen
  • Aloe Vera Gel
  • Beet Crystals
  • Organic Plant Extracts

FOOD HIGH IN CALCIUM:

Food Calcium (mg) % DV*
Yogurt, plain, low fat, 8 oz. 415 42%
Yogurt, fruit, low fat, 8 oz. 245 - 384 25% - 38%
Sardines, canned in oil, with bones, 3 oz. 324 32%
Cheddar cheese, 1 Ѕ oz shredded 306 31%
Milk, non-fat, 8 fl oz. 302 30%
Milk, reduced fat (2% milk fat), no solids, 8 fl oz. 297 30%
Milk, whole (3.25% milk fat), 8 fl oz 291 29%
Milk, buttermilk, 8 fl oz. 285 29%
Milk, lactose reduced, 8 fl oz.** 285 - 302 29 - 30%
Mozzarella, part skim 1 Ѕ oz. 275 28%
Tofu, firm, made w/calcium sulfate, Ѕ cup*** 204 20%
Orange juice, calcium fortified, 6 fl oz. 200 - 260 20 - 26%
Salmon, pink, canned, solids with bone, 3 oz. 181 18%
Pudding, chocolate, instant, made w/ 2% milk, Ѕ cup 153 15%
Cottage cheese, 1% milk fat, 1 cup unpacked 138 14%
Tofu, soft, made w/calcium sulfate, Ѕ cup*** 138 14%
Spinach, cooked, Ѕ cup 120 12%
Instant breakfast drink, various flavors and brands, powder mixed with water, 8 fl oz. 105 - 250 10 - 25%
Frozen yogurt, vanilla, soft serve, Ѕ cup 103 10%
Ready to eat cereal, calcium fortified, 1 cup 100 - 1000 10% - 100%
Turnip greens, boiled, Ѕ cup 99 10%
Kale, cooked, 1 cup 94 9%
Kale, raw, 1 cup 90 9%
Ice cream, vanilla, Ѕ cup 85 8.5%
Soy beverage, calcium fortified, 8 fl oz. 80 - 500 8 - 50%
Chinese cabbage, raw, 1 cup 74 7%
Tortilla, corn, ready to bake/fry, 1 medium 42 4%
Tortilla, flour, ready to bake/fry, one 6" diameter 37 4%
Sour cream, reduced fat, cultured, 2 Tbsp 32 3%
Bread, white, 1 oz 31 3%
Broccoli, raw, Ѕ cup 21 2%
Bread, whole wheat, 1 slice 20 2%
Cheese, cream, regular, 1 Tbsp 12 1%

SUMMARY:

"Medical literature is filled with many more articles supporting the view that calcium supplementation in huge doses, particularly without the necessary cofactors, is not the way to control or prevent osteoporosis."

"Aditional research demonstrates that such supplementation may hinder or halt critical bone remodeling, [53] cause calcification of soft muscle tissue, [54] reduce the absorption of other minerals. [55] trigger stomach acid surge, [56] induce neuro-logical symptons, generate kidney stones, impair kidney function, [57] reduce bone strength and even cause internal bleeding.[58]"

"Based on research and clinical experience, plus the studies of world renowned experts, taking more than a low-dose calcium supplement is unnecessary and taking calcium alone is worthless. "

Multivitamin/mineral supplements with an additional vitamin C, plus a small-dose of calcium/magnesium makes the most sense. Vitamin D3, ChromeMate, silicon and boron are beneficial additions.

"Responsible calcium supplementation requires calcium in smaller doses, so that YOU are in control of the amounts you consume."


ALPHA 'Calcium Health Support' uses all the cofactors recommended by Dr Betty Kamen Ph.D. and the calcium/magnesium ratio from the Dr Guy Abraham Ph.D. study


References:

[3] MS Sheikh et al. "Gastrointestinal Absorption of Calcium from Milk and Calcium Salts," New England Journal of Medicine 317 (1987):532.

[9] Ibid

[15] V Hug, letters to the editor, "Involutional Osteoporosis," New England Journal of Medicine 316 (1987):216

[16] Wical and Swoope, Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry 32 (1974):13.

[17] RR Recker, "The Effect of Milk Supplements on Calcium Metabolism, and Calcium Balance," American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 41 (1985):254

[27] CC Pfeiffer, Mental and Elenental Nutrients: A Physicians Guide to Nutrition and Health Care, (New Canaan, CT: Keats Publishing, 1975),p. 272

[31] RM Francis and DM Beaumont, letters to the editor, "Involutional Osteoporosis," New England Journal of Medicine 316 (1987): 216

[50] American Journal of Medicine 46 (1969):197

[53] HF DeLuca, "The Latest Information on Vitamin D and Bone Status," Complementary Medicine May/June (1986):14

[54] RR Recker, New England Journal of Medicine 313 (1985):70

[55] E Underwood, Trace Elements in Human and Animal Nutrition 4th edition (New York: Academic Press, 1977), p. 176

[56] Harvard Medical School Health Letter, March 1976, p. 2.

[57] Nutrition Today, March/April (1987):22

[58] Nutrition Reviews 43 (1985):345